Give a child an education for just £35 a month

Make hope a reality

Finding out that so little could help so much

“That was when we realized we could really help these children…”

Srey Nith’s Story

Duncan Bell writes – “I was was working for an Non Governmental Organisation ( NGO ) in 2012 which worked in some of the slums in South Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Part of the purpose of the organisation was as a social service to those living in the slums and to offer help for the issues that existed there – abuse, addiction, unemployment and various health problems.

srey-neang

“It soon became apparent that a lot of children in these slums didn’t attend school. If they did it was often very much on an ad hoc basis. The schools that they would attend would be a government school which would often have overcrowded classes.

“Srey Nith is one such child. This is her, on the right. Her mother is HIV positive and because of this she did not want to breast feed her new born daughter for fear of passing on the disease. As an organisation we would occasionally provide powdered milk for her so she could safely feed her baby. Funds were not available to do this on a regular basis although a generous donation by my former employer Waitrose helped as we were then able to provide the milk powder for a number of weeks. When this money ran out I took it on myself to provide the milk powder.

srey-nith

“When visiting the slum in which they live I would always look out for this family and was amazed at the cleanliness and order of their home. This was down to to Srey Nith often being there to look after her little sister while her mother went out to work. The “work” would be walking the streets and busy roads collecting either plastic bottles or tin cans for recycling. A day’s work doing this would probably mean a payment of about $5 (£3). Srey Nith was 9 years old and growing up quickly looking after her younger brother and sister and keeping their house in order.

“I decided that £35 a month was money well spent in sending her to a good independent school. The payment included school fees, administration costs, books and her uniform.

“Srey Nith now gets lessons in English and Computer Skills.  I’ll keep the sponsorship going until she’s completed her schooling. £35 a month isn’t going to make that much difference to me. But it will make a massive difference to her.

“One day her mother’s illness will take her life. When that happens it may well fall to Srey Nith to support her family totally. I hope, I truly hope that when the time comes that little gift of £35 a month means Srey Nith will be able to earn her living safely and with dignity.”

Someone like you made a difference to Srey Pheourn

Here she is reading her ‘Thank You’ letter to her sponsor

How Do I sponsor a child?

Simply download our Sponsor’s Guide which contains a sponsorship form. Fill it out and send it to us.

What happens then?

We will contact you once your sponsorship has been allocated to a child and give you the details.

What do I get?

A photo of the child will be sent to you along with a background to their and their families lives. You will also receive 6 monthly reports of how the are doing at school.

How long does it last?

Ideally we would like to sponsors to commit to three years. This gives the child a chance to get a good education in English and computer skills.

Can I remain anonymous?

Yes. You will not be obliged to make any contact with the child nor have your identity made known to them.

What does the child get?

For your £35 a month the child will receive:

• All School Fees Paid

• An invaluable education in English and Computing

• A Helping Hand into their future

And you can be sure every penny of Your gift goes to the child’s education – nowhere else.

Download the sponsorship form now

I was thrilled to get my letter

“Now we look forward to them coming in the post every six months. Apart from anything else, it lets us know we’ve done some good for a small child who would have no hope otherwise”

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